German tragedy of destiny

Other cities

 

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1940-1942

 

The heavy attacks are not particularly common and these targeted

the major cities in the north and west of Germany.

 

From 1943 on the bombings increased dramatically and hit some of the smaller cities.

 

12 January 1940, Westerland/Sylt

12 May 1940, Hamm

16 May 1940, Münster

20/21 June 1940, Bielefeld

20/21 July 1940, Wismar, Paderborn

29 December 1941, Krefeld

11 January 1942, Wilhelmshaven

29 January 1942, Münster

23-27 April 1942, Rostock

7 June 1942, Emden

23 June 1942, Emden

10 August 1942, Osnabrück

12/13 August 1942, Mainz

3 September 1942, Karlsruhe

 

In 1942, the bomb attacks were carried out mainly against military objects.

The number of 6,800 civilian deaths could regarded still fairly low.

 

Mainz

 

 

1943

 

27 January 1943, Wilhelmshaven

12 February 1943, Wilhelmshaven

19/20 February 1943, Wilhelmshaven

21 April 1943, Stettin

15 June 1943, Oberhausen

22 June 1943, Krefeld

23 June 1943, Mülheim

23 June 1943, Oberhausen

25 June 1943, Elberfeld

30 July 1943, Saarbrücken

31 July 1943, Remscheid

17 August 1943, Regensburg

18 August 1943, Peenemünde

23 August 1943, Leverkusen

31 August 1943, Mönchen-Gladbach

2 October 1943, Hagen

9 October 1943, Danzig

9 October 1943, Anklam

10 October 1943, Münster

21 October 1943, Leipzig

3 November 1943, Wilhelmshaven

4 December 1943, Leipzig

 

Compared to the previous year, the attacks of 1943 aimed more at the destruction of the civilian population.

With 100,000 dead, the number of victims was 14 times more than that of last year.

 

Peenemünde

 

 

1944

 

6 January 1944, Stettin

11 January 1944, Halberstadt

11 January 1944, Braunschweig

15 January 1944, Braunschweig

20 February 1944, Braunschweig

20 February 1944, Leipzig

26 February 1944, Augsburg

14 April 1944, Augsburg

18 April 1944, Cuxhaven

28 April 1944, Friedrichshafen

8 May 1944, Braunschweig

13 August 1944, Braunschweig

13 August 1944, Rüsselsheim

14 August 1944, Kaiserslautern

27 August 1944, Königsberg

30 August 1944, Emden

30 August 1944, Stettin

30 August 1944, Königsberg

13 September 1944, Osnabrück

5/6 October 1944, Saarbrücken

6 October 1944, Stralsund

15 October 1944, Braunschweig

16 October 1944, Wilhelmshaven

18 October 1944, Bonn

19 October 1944, Mainz

6 November 1944, Koblenz

9 November 1944, Wanne-Eickel

16 November 1944, Düren

18 November 1944, Münster

19 November 1944, Wanne-Eickel

22 November 1944, Aschaffenburg

27 November 1944, Freiburg

3 December 1944, Hagen

4 December 1944, Karlsruhe

6 December 1944, Soest

7 December 1944, Gießen

16 December 1944, Ludwigshafen

17 December 1944, Ulm

 

Braunschweig, children's corpses

 

 

1945

 

Even as the end of the war was foreseeable, the destruction of the German cities continued

with hundreds of thousands of civilian casualties.

 

7 January 1945, Hanau

17 January 1945, Paderborn

3 February 1945, Wiesbaden

5 February 1945, Bonn

5 February 1945, Regensburg

14/15 February 1945, Chemnitz

16/19 February 1945, Wesel

16 February 1945, Regensburg

22 February 1945, Worms

22 February 1945, Hildesheim

23 February 1945, Schwäbisch Hall

4 March 1945, Ulm

5 March 1945, Chemnitz

7 March 1945, Dessau

10 March 1945, Scholven-Buer

22 March 1945, Hildesheim

25 March 1945, Münster

25 March 1945, Osnabrück

30 March 1945, Wilhelmshaven

7 April 1945, Dessau

7 April 1944, Nordhausen

8 April 1945, Halberstadt

10 April 1945, Plauen

14 April 1945, Potsdam

25 April 1945, Wangerooge

25 April 1945, Berchtesgaden

 

Even in the last three and a half months of the war, in which virtually

everything was decided militarily,

in the German cities - or what was left of them -

more than 130,000 people were killed by bombing or strafing.

 

Worms

 

 

The air terror of the Anglo-Americans hit a total of 161 German cities.

 

The majority of the more than 1,4 million sorties against Germany

aimed primarily at civilians, not at military or industrial targets.

 

Beside the previously mentioned cities the list of towns where more than 50 percent of housing was destroyed:

Friedrichshafen

Pirmasens

Prenzlau

Offenbach

Bad Kreuznach

Siegen

Rheine

Bocholt

Hagen

Frankfurt an der Oder

Donauwörth

 

Among others, such towns suffered severe damage as

Neumünster

Offenburg

Reutlingen

Starubing

Fulda

Wetzlar

Ingolstadt

Neuss

Oberhausen

Minden

etc.

 

Not to be forgotten are the many smaller places, such as the Eifel villages

which have particularly suffered.

 

Almost all major and medium cities in Germany had a long history,

up to the Middle Ages.

The inner cities had old urban cores with Romanesque, Gothic, Baroque and

Neoclassical churches and monuments.

The outer face of Germany was characterized by its unique old towns of

stone, timber and slate.

These irreplaceable historic witnesses of history were systematically wiped out

piece by piece.

As a consequence, on the ruins rose the faceless German cities of today -

all after the same scheme, fast and ugly, in the style of the fifties.