German tragedy of destiny

German casualties in the second world war

 

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INTRODUCTION

 

 

In the course of the second world war Germany suffered horrendous losses, in human life as well as in territories.

 

During and after the war far more German civilians died than soldiers in military actions. The German victims of the war numbered 15,8 millions. Soldiers and MIAs fallen in the course of military actions numbered 4,3 millions (27%), while the civilian persons killed during flight, bombardment, captivity numbered 11,5 millions (73%)

    

 

    

It means that three quarters of the German victims were civilians. That is, discounting the POWs, in the first line elderly, women and children.

 

Most victims lost their life not during the war but following the ending of the hostilities in the course of expulsion, in forced marches and transports, in captivity or perished by malnutrition, cold or died violently under allied occupation.

 

 

On the whole 15,8 millions dead,

 

of which 4,3 millions soldiers, 11,5 millions civilians

 

 

Germany suffered great losses also regarding its territories. Such ancient German provinces came under alien occupation as for example East Prussia, West Prussia, Posen, Danzig, East Brandenburg, Pomerania, Silesia. From those areas nearly 11 millions Germans were forcefully expelled! (Add to this number a further 2,5 millions ethnic Germans who were deported from the eastern countries of Europe.)

 

The map below depicts the partition of Germany after the war. You can see the zones occupied by the three Western powers as well as the Soviets and the Poles respectively the lost eastern territories.

 

 

 

 


 The website was created on the basis of the book Ein deutsches Trauerspiel by Wolfhard Welzel published in 2008 with the magnanimous consent and permission of the Grabert-Verlag of Tubingen.

Copyright © 2009-2010 Gábor Lőrincz-Véger - All rights reserved.