German tragedy of destiny

Prisoners' camps

 

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PRISONERS' CAMPS

 

     „Two out of seven return home -

that is the norm. It's far worst in the men's camps.

In Ketschendorf every second dies of dysentery, tuberculosis and exhaustion. ...

Efi Hartenstein

 

  Cruelty and death were the terrible fate of millions of prisoners.


This began for many already en route to the camps.
Thousands died in the long death marches through starvation, dehydration, frostbite, exhaustion or brutality of the guards.


Weeks of travel in cattle cars, without food in the freezing cold, demanded also tens of thousands of victims.


The conditions in the prison camps were in many cases no better. Here the prisoners were killed by malnutrition, disease, forced labor and torture.


But the prisoners suffered not only in East and Southeast Europe. Hundreds of thousands died in the custody of the Western Allies in the camps on the Rhine. They died in wet and cold, in the mud and dirt, without shelter, without food, without medical care.

 

2,000,000 dead

 

Number of prisoners' camps at home and abroad:

Soviet Union = 2,022

Great Britain = 396

USA = 155 main camps, 760 sub-camps

Germany = 382

France = 207

Italy = 111

Norway = 75

Africa = 72

Belgium = 45

Netherlands = 20

Denmark = 19

Austria = 19

Greece = 11

Luxembourg = 11 and

Cyprus, Gibraltar, Jamaica, Malta = 5